• If you are interested in participating in this study, please click here and email us at:

    med-mcin-fdopa@monash.edu

    Psychosis is a devastating condition that consists of delusions, hallucinations, disorganised thinking and cognitive and emotional disturbances. It is a defining characteristic of schizophrenia, and occurs frequently in other major mental illnesses such as depression and bipolar disorder. These disorders rank among the world’s top ten causes of death and disability and cost the Australian economy billions of dollars annually.

    All current treatments for psychosis change levels of a neurotransmitter called dopamine, particularly in circuits of the brain that link frontal and striatal regions. Dopamine dysregulation within these circuits is thought to play a central role in the genesis of psychotic symptoms, but precisely how these changes arise remains a mystery.

    In this study, we are using new scanning technology that allows the simultaneous measurement of both dopamine and brain circuit function. We aim to pinpoint the brain circuit mechanisms that drive dopamine dysregulation in psychosis, thereby leading to new treatment targets.

    People Involved

    Alex Fornito Sidhant Chopra Nancy Tran
  • Information for Participants

    If you are interested in participating in this study, please click here and email us at:

    med-mcin-fdopa@monash.edu

    This study has been approved by the Monash University Human Ethics Committee (MUHREC). Project Number: CF14/2613 - 2014001413.